Faculty Members Currently Qualified to Supervise Graduate Students


Dr. Vickie Baracos
Metabolism in wasting disorders: skeletal muscle atrophy and cancer-associated cachexia. A number of pathological states may be defined as wasting disorders - several examples include cancer, AIDS, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. My research program focuses on the metabolic abnormalities that underlie this wasting, particularly of the skeletal muscles. More...



Dr. Gordon Chan
In my laboratory, research is centered on the mechanism of cell cycle control and particularly the regulation of accurate, chromosome segregation during mitosis. The mitotic checkpoint is a failsafe mechanism by which the cell prevents premature anaphase and ensures accurate chromosome segregation.  By investigating the molecular mechanism of the mitotic checkpoint, we can better evaluate these genes as potential cancer drug targets as well as contributing to the basic understanding of cancer.More

Dr. Yangxin Fu

The objective of the Fu laboratory is to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying ovarian tumorigenesis, with a particular interest in the role of Notch signaling pathway in ovarian cancer development and progression. More...

 



Dr. Roseline Godbout
Retinoblastoma, a childhood tumour of the retina, results from malignant transformation of precursor cells. Retinal precursors are multipotent neuroectodermal cells that can differentiate into all the different types of neuronal and glial cells that make up the mature tissue. There are
currently two major projects in the lab. The first is to study the function and regulation of genes that are expressed at the early stages of retinal development. The second is to study the role of the DEAD box gene DDX1, encoding an RNA unwinding protein, in normal retinal development and in retinoblastoma. More...

Dr. Michael Hendzel
In my laboratory, we are examining how chromatin and regulatory molecules are compartmentalized within the cell nucleus. Our current research programs involve defining the dynamics of movement of chromatin, subnuclear structures involved in compartmentalizing regulatory molecules that act on chromatin and RNA, and the movement of individual regulatory molecules within the cell nucleus. We have found that most molecules move considerably slower than expected for their molecular weight. More...

Dr. Mary Hitt
My research focuses on the development of gene therapy  vectors that minimize these side effects without compromising anticancer activity. Currently we are investigating adenovirus vectors carrying modified fiber proteins and/or tissue-specific promoters to target expression of toxic genes specifically to the tumor. More...




Dr. John Lewis

 

 We study prostate cancer, the most commonly diagnosed cancer in Canadian men. Our goal is to foster an environment where scientists, doctors and clinical researchers work together to address key challenges in prostate cancer care. As a team, we hope to accelerate the transfer of research discoveries from the "bench to the bedside" to make an impact on those living with cancer.
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Dr. Sandy McEwan

 

Functional imaging in cancer. More...

 

 



Dr. David Murray
The basic research in my laboratory focuses on understanding the basic mechanisms by which mammalian cells respond to ionizing radiation and DNA-damaging anticancer drugs, with an emphasis on DNA-repair pathways. My major area of translational research interest is in identifying the genetic factors (polymorphisms) that determine the extreme response of some cancer patients to anticancer therapeutics such as radiation therapy and cisplatin-based chemotherapy. More...

Dr. Manijeh Pasdar
Our principal research interest is to understand mechanisms regulating cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion and interaction in epithelia during normal epithelial biogenesis and in tumorigenesis/metastasis. More....




Dr. Linda Pilarski
Research in the Pilarski laboratory focuses on the cellular and molecular biology of the malignant clone in multiple myeloma, a deadly and incurable cancer of the immune system. A second research focus is an analysis of molecules involved in the migratory traffic of normal and malignant lymphocytes throughout the body, and on the adhesion receptors that mediate interactions to the extracellular microenvironment in the vasculature, the bone marrow and the thymus. An emerging area of research in the Pilarski laboratory is the development of novel, high throughput technology to detect and monitor cancer cells as the disease progresses, and to facilitate the design of therapy customized to target the vulnerabilities of the malignant clone in each patient. More....

Dr. Lynne-Marie Postovit
One of our major goals is to see the work that we do in the lab translate into new treatments or early detection methods for cancer patients: We want to translate our scientific results into clinical practice. More....




Dr. Andrew Shaw
Our laboratory is interested in a novel and exciting family of proteins which may be prototypic suppressors of tumor metastasis. Transmembrane four (TM4) proteins are an ancient and conserved family of channel-like proteins with fourpresumed transmembrane domains. Although their unique function is obscure TM4 proteins are known to modify receptor mediated signaling, affecting cell adhesion, cell proliferation and cell migration. Recently loss of TM4's has been shown to correlate with progression in several human tumors suggesting that TM4's may act as unique suppressors of metastatic spread. More....

Dr. Jack Tuszynski
Research Interests:
  • Models of motor protein function
  • Microtubule assembly and function
  • Integration of mathematical modelling into the pharmaceutical development process
  • Rational drug design

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    Dr.Alan Underhill
    The Underhill laboratory is interested in deciphering how master regulators of melanocyte development contribute to melanoma pathogenesis. In addition, we are also examining how histone modifications regulate the balance between cell proliferation and differentiation, and how this is overridden in cancer.. More....




    Dr. Michael Weinfeld
    Several years ago we developed a postlabelling assay that allowed us to detect a number of lesions in irradiated DNA. We have applied this assay to the study of drugs that enhance the level of DNA damage in radioresistant and chemotherapy-resistant hypoxic cells. We observed that these drugs can mimic oxygen by producing DNA strand breaks with specific termini that require additional processing before the strands can be rejoined. We have also made use of the assay to monitor the repair of these lesions by purified enzymes and cell-free extracts. More....

    Dr. Frank Wuest
    My research is embedded in the multidisciplinary field of translational cancer research. Research efforts are mainly aimed at the evaluation and translation of the diagnostic and therapeutic potential of novel molecular targets involved in the development and progression of cancer by means of molecular imaging techniques to enhance patient care. More....